Bolin Centre Seminar Series | Research Area 3
Hosted by: Research Area 3
 

Speaker                               Lan Wang Erlandsson, Stockholm Resilience, Stockholm University

Title                                      Terrestrial moisture recycling: a land-atmosphere process with governance appeal
When & where                    13h00-14h00 in Ahlmannsalen, Geoscience Building

Fika will be served after the seminar.

Abstract

A large portion of evaporation, interception and transpiration from land comes down again as precipitation over land. This atmospheric part of the water cycle referred to as terrestrial moisture recycling is, thus, a land-atmosphere interaction process that allows land management decisions to influence precipitation, with further knock-on implications for downwind land and water resources. For example, deforestation – through reduced rainfall – may result in drought-related self-amplified forest loss, changes in river flows, and crop failure.

These insights have piqued the interests from researchers and practitioners working with resource management and governance: Should the moisture from forest be considered an ecosystem service? Should the moisture transfer between countries be regulated and governed? In the latest UN Water report, moisture recycling was also labelled a “natural-based solution”. At the same time, it is clear that the complex links between land-use change and rainfall go beyond moisture recycling.

This lecture aims to give a brief overview of the branch of moisture recycling research that crossed over from the climate and hydrology science communities, to appeal to social science disciplines. I also view this lecture as an opportunity for a broader conversation on the challenges and dilemmas of translating biophysical insights to useful tools in management and governance.

 

Bolin Centre Seminar Series | Research Area 3
Hosted by: Research Area 3
 

Speaker                               Joshua P. Schimel, Professor, University of California, Santa Barbara

Title                                      Writing Science
When & where                    14h30-15h30 in Ahlmannsalen, Geoscience Building

Abstract
As a scientist, you are a professional writer: your career is built on successful proposals and papers. Two elements are fundamental to writing successfully: structure and language. Our writing is successful when we tell an effective story about nature and how it works. But stories work because they have effective structure that puts the right information in the right place – so how do we structure a strong story? How do we to use different structures for different types of documents? Academics also have acquired a collection of bad, and unnecessary, language habits that weaken communication. We like reading good writing – so how do we write it?

WELCOME!